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About

Father and son in supermarket. "Dad, what are these?" "That's a 3pack of condoms son for secondary school lads. 1 for Friday night, 1 for Saturday night and 1 for Sunday night." "What about the 6pack dad?" "Those are for University lads. 2 for Friday night, 2 for Satuday night and 2 for Sunday night." "Well dad, what about the 12pack then?" "Married men son. 1 for January, 1 for February, 1 for March ..."

How Well Do Condoms Work?

Over the course of a year:

For added protection, many couples use condoms along with another method of birth control, like birth control pills or an IUD. For condoms to have their best chance of working, they must be used every time a couple has sex.

A condom cannot be reused. A new condom should be used each time a couple has sex and it must be used from start to finish to protect against pregnancy and STDs. Oil-based lubricants (such as mineral oil, petroleum jelly, or baby oil) should never be used with condoms because they can break down the rubber.

And a condom that seems dry, sticky, or stiff when it comes out of the package, or is past its expiration date, should be thrown away and a new one used instead. It's helpful to have several condoms on hand in case there's a problem with one. It's best to store unused condoms in a cool, dry place.

Do Condoms Help Protect Against STDs?

Yes. Latex, polyurethane, and polyisoprene condoms can help prevent many STDs if they are used correctly. Condoms made of lambskin do not work well to prevent STDs, including HIV/AIDs.

Condoms do not protect against infections spread from sores on the skin not covered by a condom (such as the base of the penis or scrotum). Couples having sex must always use condoms to protect against STDs even when using another method of birth control.